Courses

Curriculum

  • The International Program in Conflict Resolution and Mediation (MA Public Policy) curriculum offers students a comprehensive study of conflicts and their resolution from a variety of perspectives. In addition to providing a theoretical foundation, the curriculum emphasizes development of practical skills through courses in negotiations, mediation and facilitation.

 

First Semester

  • The first semester is dedicated to obtaining in-depth knowledge about the theoretical and practical components of conflict resolution. Lecturers derive from a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to international law, political science, public policy, social psychology, cultural anthropology, and religious studies. In the first semester, all students are registered for a course in negotiation skills. A total of seven core courses are taken in the first semester. Students also complete the Interdisciplinary Seminar, which exposes students to experts and leaders in conflict resolution as well as educational trips throughout the year.

 

Mediation Workshop

  • Conducted in between the first and second semesters, the Mediation Workshop builds upon the material covered in the first semester while strengthening the students' negotiation skills through role playing and simulations.

 

Second and Third Semesters

  • During the second and third semesters students choose from a variety of electives and seminar courses according to their interests. Noteworthy electives include advanced negotiations and facilitation and consensus building. These skills are integral to any future work environment. Emphasis is placed on research and analysis during these semesters. A total of two seminars and six electives are taken between these two semesters. 

 

Courses offered by other TAU International Programs

  • The International Program in Conflict Resolution and Mediation also allows students to take up to two courses (4 credits) offered by other Tel Aviv University International Programs based on the student’s learning goals and based on course availability.  Note that not all courses are available every year. Each year a list of available elective courses are provided by the other international programs and students are notified of those courses towards the end of the fall semester. This may includes courses from the following programs: Security and Diplomacy, Emergency and Disaster Management, Political Communications, Crisis and Trauma Studies and others.

 

Comprehensive Final Assignment 

  • At the end of the third semester students are required to complete a final assignment in order to be eligible to graduate. The assignment will be in the form of a take-home exam with a 10-15 page response. Subject matter from the all core courses is covered. This assignment may be submitted remotely. Details are provided to incoming students.

 

Thesis Option

  • Students have the option to write a thesis upon completion of their MA. For further information, click here

 

Credits

  • Students complete a total of 41 credit hours.

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List of Offered Courses in 2017-2018

 enlightened Courses and/or lecturers vary from year to year and are subject to change.

CORE COURSES

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Principles and Processes of Negotiation in Conflict Resolution

Principles and Processes of Negotiation in Conflict Resolution (2 credits)Lecturer: Yonatan Kowarsky, Academic Director for Israel Center for Negotiation and Mediation, mediator/lawyer, and Supervisor and Trainer for National Mediation Program​​​

Course Description: The course will offer to the students an in-depth understanding of the negotiation process. It will include:

  • Grounds for preparation of the negotiation process, while applying a negotiation management model, based on interests and the appreciation of cognitive processes occurring while negotiating.
  • An introduction to a number of tools and skills aimed to improve overall negotiation capabilities - while coping with the emotional aspects and enhancing each participant's awareness to his or hers own personal stile.

An emphasis will be placed on the cultivation of long term, both business and workplace relationships. The principal premises, which will be outlined throughout the course, assume that skilled negotiators can bypass unnecessary conflicts and resolve disputes, while negotiating without the aid of third party intervention. Therefore, an outline of multi party-negotiation principles will be discussed as well.

 

Research Methods

Research Methods (3 credits)Lecturer: Dr. Udi Sommer, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: The purposes of this course are to provide students with useful tools for engaging in empirical research in the social sciences and to help students understand literature that uses a range of research methods. Students will learn how to think about theoretical problems in terms of empirical models – theory, hypothesis testing, data collection, presentation of research, and reading and writing research papers.

This class will be divided into three part, each refering to a specific research method: Quantitative, Qualitative and Historical. Each part will be offered by a Professor specialized in the field.

This course will prepare students to:

  1. Identify and evaluate scholarship on conflict resolution and mediation.
  2. Design an individual research project, matching theory with the appropriate research methodology.
  3. Obtain and evaluate information relevant to the execution of a research project.
  4. Present findings from a research project.
History of the Middle East

History of the Middle East (3 credits)Lecturer: Dr. Uriya Shavit, Senior Lecturer, Department for Arabic and Islamic Studies and the Program for Religious Studies, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: The course surveys the major historical processes evolving in the modern Middle East in the past two centuries. It analyzes the interaction between internal developments and Western political, economic and cultural influences.

It discusses the emergence of modern nationalism; the foundation of new states in the early Twentieth Century, their struggle for independence and their grappling with parliamentary systems under the Mandate system. It will examine the replacement of the old elites by new radical military elites, which became in turn more moderate in the course of years, as well as their confrontation with the rising tide of Islamic radicalism.

Political Approaches to Conflict

Political Approaches to the Management and Resolution of International Conflicts (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Steven J. Klein, Ben Gurion University and senior editor at Haaretz newspaper

Course Description: Numerous international conflicts since the end of World War II have been managed or resolved by third parties through negotiations and various forms of interventions. During this period, the number of interstate conflicts has declined dramatically while internationalized intrastate conflicts have emerged as the dominant problem facing the international community. This course will survey a variety of political approaches and strategies for managing and resolving such conflicts.

The course will begin with a discussion of the causes of international conflicts as perceived by the major theoretical frameworks for the study of international relations, including realist, constructivist and liberal approaches. Students will learn principles of conflict, bargaining and conflict management theory, focusing on concepts such as the mutually hurting stalemate, conflict ripeness, security dilemmas, bargaining zones, reservation points, zones of possible agreement and two-level games.

Students will then explore the costs and benefits of peaceful and forceful strategies that seek to manage or resolve conflicts through democratization, the promotion of trade, ideational change and timed intervention. Specifically, the class will discuss the role of third parties – be they international institutions or individuals in resolving ethnic conflicts and deterrence, both conventional and nuclear, as a strategy to stabilize conflicts. The course will also examine the dramatic decline in interstate conflicts in contrast to the rise of intrastate conflicts since the fall of Communism, and utilizing the theoretical strategies discussed during the course, consider what lessons if any are applicable to the Middle East.

Socio-Psychological Approaches to Conflict

Socio-Psychological Approaches to Conflict and Conflict Management (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Dennis Kahn, Postdoctoral fellow, Lund University

Course Description: Social Psychology provides many critical insights into the understanding of social conflicts and their management. These include the interaction of personality and situation in the outbreak of conflicts and attempts at resolution, the critical importance of the subjective construal of conflict, and the roles of groups and group membership in conflicts. Among the topics to be covered in this introductory course are group identification and group perception, naïve realism, reactive devaluation, social dilemmas, personality and individual differences, emotions, culture and protected/sacred values.

Cultural Approaches to Conflict Resolution: Islamic and Jewish Perspectives

Cultural Approaches to Conflict: Islamic and Jewish Perspectives on Conflict (2 credits)

Lecturers: Dr. M. Basem, Ohio State University and Rabbi Dr. Daniel Roth, Pardes Institute for Judaism and Conflict Resolution

Course Description: Judaism and Islam are two broad cultures that have aspects of peacemaking inherent to their systems. Each having direct impacts on the way peace is conceptualized and the way conflicts are resolved in those Islamic and Jewish societies, because they embody and elaborate upon the highest morals, ethical principles and ideals of social harmony. Conflict resolution scholars and practitioners must take into consideration the religious and cultural traditions of Jewish and Muslim communities to address conflicts involving them, especially in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Although the current image of religion is often associated with conflict and violence, in fact, notions of peacebuilding are deeply embedded in the religious vision of Islam and Judaism and Jewish and Muslim communities have developed various approaches and tools to address conflicts. Exploring different perspectives and drawing links between Islamic, Jewish and Western conflict resolution approaches, this course will explore principles, values, and practices of peace and conflict resolution rooted in Jewish and Islamic texts and traditions.
 
 
International Law and Dispute Resolution

International Law and Dispute Resolution (2 credits)

Lecturer: Daniel Reisner, former head of the Israel Defence Force's International Law Department and former senior negotiator of peace treaties from 1994-2007

Course Description: The course provides students with a critical view of international law relevant to conflict and conflict resolution. Focusing primarily on the Arab-Israeli conflict as a case study, the course will address topics including the sources of international law, the law of sovereignty and statehood, the laws of war, acquisition and loss of territory, trust territories and rights of self-determination, the role and authority of international institutions such as the UN and International Court of Justice, the law of human rights, refugee law, international criminal law, international law concerning terrorism, and laws of occupied territories. 

Mediation Workshop

Mediation Workshop (4 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Brian Polkinghorn, Salisbury University, Fulbright Alumni Ambassador 

Course Description: The Mediation Workshop examines the core concepts and principle of mediation as it applies to cases ranging from the interpersonal to international levels of engagement.  The course will also study a variety of approaches or "styles" of mediation including, but not limited to, facilitative, evaluative, transformative, narrative and eclectic.

Large portions of the class will be reserved for small group role plays and other experiential learning exercises that allow students the opportunity to explore and experiment with key mediation skills, techniques and tactics.

Graduates of this course receive a certificate of completion in International Mediation from Tel Aviv University.

SEMINARS

 

 

Students choose 2 seminar courses from the list below, for a total of 6 credits.

Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation in the Middle East

Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation in the Middle East (3 credits)
Lecturer: Dr. Clive Lipchin, Director, Center for Transboundary Water Management, Arava Institute for Environmental Studies

Course Description: The objective of the course is to review and discuss types, sources and aspects of environmental conflicts at the city, regional, national and mostly international level. These conflicts will be analyzed and classified by structural and subjective approaches with respect to related issues such as environmental justice, environmental awareness and planning policy as well as with respect to strategies and instruments of their resolution.

Nationalism and Ethnic Conflicts

Nationalism and Ethnic Conflicts (3 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Evgeni Klauber, Department of Political Science, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: What is a nation? Where is the nation’s homeland? Who is part of "us" and who is part of "them"? Why some ethnic groups mobilize to civil wars while others remain silent? How are these questions answered? Why do these answers alter? These and other questions stand at the center of inter- and intra-national conflicts around the globe. This seminar will unfold the main theoretical approaches to understand them and will try to provide possible solutions for ethnic conflicts. It will then investigate the interactions between state-building and nation-building, the relationship between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights, the nexus between nationalism, ethnicity and conflict, the colonial legacies of nationalism (especially among Post-Soviet newly emerged states), the religious nationalism, and the impact of globalization on ethnicity and nationalism. We will also try to integrating ideas of culture, ethnicity, and multiculturalism into conflict resolution.

Leadership and Conflict

Leadership and Conflict (3 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Nimrod Rosler, Tel Aviv University School of Public Policy

Course Description: One of many influential figures in the life of an intractable conflict is the leader. She or he has the ability to harness and mobilize the public towards the creation and intensification of conflicts or lead the people to dialogue with the other side. The course will be comprised of two main parts: the first part will examine the phenomenon of leadership. We will discuss the sources of power, the influences of the leader and test models describing different types of leadership. In the second part of the course we will examine the role of the leader in various stages of the conflict - his or her motivation, basic strengths and the tools available for social influence. 

Israeli Politics and Society

Israeli Politics and Society (3 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Yael Shomer. Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: This seminar will present a rather broad, and yet very brief, introductory survey of some of Israel's major social, economic, cultural and political aspects in their respective historical developments. It will attempt to present an evenhanded view of the achievements, difficulties and failures in all these domestic areas. More specifically, it will deal with Israel's changing social, ethnic, national, religious and ideological schisms and the various policy impacts of this multicultural composition, as well as with its governmental, political, legal and military institutions and other public organizations, their functioning and their operation.

Advanced Negotiations

Advanced Negotiations (3 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Hilla Dotan, Organizational Behavior Department at the Coller School of Management, Tel-Aviv University

Course Description: This skills-oriented course is an extension of the Principles and Processes of Negotiations in Conflict course taken in the Fall semester. The course provides an exposure to further analytical tools, frameworks, simulations and debriefings with the purpose of providing participants the opportunity to identify, analyze and develop their negotiation abilities in both situations of collective conflicts and within institutional settings. 

ELECTIVE COURSES

 

 

Students take 6 elective courses for a total of 12 credits. 

Public Diplomacy and Propaganda

Public Diplomacy and Propaganda (3 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Giora Goodman, University College, London England

Course Description: The rapid advance of mass communications across the globe and its impact on domestic politics and international relations has had significant consequences for the framing of domestic policies and the practice of diplomacy. One of the most notable of these has been the increasing governmental efforts to control the media environment by dissemination of propaganda – often termed more politely, “information” or “explanation” – in order to influence domestic and foreign audiences, mass or elite, and attain short and longer-term policy goals. This course will consider the real or perceived effect of propaganda and public diplomacy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The use of various organizations and techniques for influencing domestic and foreign audiences – printed media, radio, film, television and internet – will be illustrated by case-studies and analyzed in terms of theory and practice. Particularly emphasized will be the influence of propaganda and public diplomacy activities and outlets in the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

International Humanitarian Aid and Development Organizations

International Humanitarian Aid and Development Organizations (2 credits)

Lecturer: Daniel Beaudoin, Ph.D. candidate, humanitarian and civil-military adviser

Course Description: The role of humanitarian aid agencies is thought to be to save lives and ameliorate suffering. Their level of success depends on varying factors, from a topography that might make communication and transport more or less easy, to the prevalence of corruption and insecurity in distribution chains and to the increasingly politicized nature of humanitarian aid. A significant factor in meeting humanitarian objectives, however, is the capacity of humanitarian officials to negotiate access to beneficiaries and to secure protection both for recipients and for staff in the context of often very sensitive political and military environments. This course provides a unique opportunity for critical reflection, analysis, and debate on the negotiation approaches of INGOs working in development, relief, and advocacy contexts. The course will study several conflict arenas, and also provide a case study of humanitarian advocacy and aid operations as conducted by the International Committee of the Red Cross and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency in the Palestinian Territories.

Practicum in International Humanitarian Aid and Development Organizations

Practicum in International Humanitarian Aid and Development Organizations (4 credits)

Lecturers: Daniel Beaudoin, Ph.D. candidate, humanitarian and civil-military adviser

Course Description: Students will become closely acquainted and involved with both the national non-governmental organizations, as well as the work of the international aid and development agencies that operate in Israel and the Palestinian Territories (PT). This in depth and personal encounter with the national and international aid and human rights organizations in Israel will allow the students to experience firsthand the complexities and varied approaches and challenges that these organizations face in the implementation of their respective missions. The learning experience will combine theoretical aspects together with practical understanding and reflective processes. The learning process will take place in class, in the field and through reflective meetings in small groups with the lecturer in the course of the semester. This course involves 2.5 hours of class time per week and an internship of 40 hours in the field.

Game Theory and Conflict Resolution

Game Theory and Conflict Resolution (2 credits) 

Lecturer: Dr. Maya Diamant, Faculty of Management, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: A conflict is an interactive situation. The course of the conflict as well as its resolution depend on the decisions made by the various parties involved. Each party, when considering its decisions, should take into account the decisions made by all the other parties. Game theory studies decision making in such interactive environments.

We will present prototypes of various games and study basic concepts required for their analysis like domination and equilibrium. Emphasize will be put on the need to change the "rules" of the game when it results in undesirable outcome, and designing rules to obtain a desired result.

We will highlight the differences between decision making of a single agent and interactive decision making, namely, a game. One of the differences is that in the first case we are aiming at getting an optimal decision. In games optimality does not always apply, and the result of games can be dismal even when all parties behave rationally. Israel, which, as the website of this program claims, is the Silicon Valley of Conflict Resolution is also the Death Valley of Frustratingly Unresolved Conflict. The frustration may partly due to the lack of understanding of the fact that in interactive situations good will and rationality do not necessarily guarantee good results.

Palestinian Politics and Society

Palestinian Politics and Society (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. M. Basem,  Ohio State

Course Description: This course deals with the story of modern Palestinian Society, Politics, and Culture.  This is a story that will begin in the late 19th century, and end in the 21st century.  While the course will deal with the historical developments that began in the 19th century, we will move to focus the bulk of our class on the middle and late 20th century, and to the current events that are presently taking place and which have been having a powerful impact on the search for independence and statehood.  The Palestinian Story is currently being somewhat revised within the context of the current events that are taking place in the Middle East.  This is by no sense a linear story, but rather a meandering one where the writers are constantly rethinking their plots in reaction to the events that have been shaping their environment.

Effective Facilitation and Consensus Building

Effective Facilitation and Consensus Building (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Yuval Kalish, Tel Aviv University School of Management

Course Description: Students in this advanced seminar will learn a set of tools and techniques that are often used in organizational conflict management. Techniques such as conflict assessment, group facilitation for effective performance and decision-making, and consensus building will be presented and experienced by the students. The theoretical basis of the course will be supplemented by experiential use of the techniques.

Practical Analysis Tools in Humanitarian Contexts

Assessment Tools in Conflict Zones (2 credits)

Lecturers: Chamutal Afek-Eitam, CEO and Founder of 3 Million Club

Course Description: Assessment Tools in Conflict Zones will provide students with a set of tools for conflict assessment,  analysis and evaluation for field practitioners including:

  • Humanitarian foundations
  • Emergency management, response and programming of people and operations
  • Humanitarian assessment, Monitoring and evaluation 
  • Capacity building
  • Security management
  • Children in emergencies
  • Third sector innovation
Buddhist Perspectives on Conflict, Reconciliation and Peace

Buddhist Perspectives on Conflict, Reconciliation and Peace (1 credit)

Lectuer: Dr. Keren Arbel, Department of East Asian Studies, Tel Aviv University

Course Description: This course will focus on Buddhist understanding of internal and external conflicts and the ways we can settle them and cultivate inner and outer peace. Buddhist thought offers a perspective of non-violence as a way to peace. It offers a way to encounter conflict, pain, grief and anger without attacking or running away; a way to transform conflicts through deep listening and compassion. 

 

Advanced Social Psychology of Conflict and Conflict Management

Advanced Social Psychology of Conflict and Conflict Managment (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Dennis Kahn, Postdoctoral fellow, Lund University

Course Description: The course builds on the course social psychological approaches to conflict and conflict management, given in the fall semester and in the advanced course, the students will go beyond the broad social-psychological theories of conflict and conflict management and explore in-depth topics such as apology and reconciliation, how collective memory, especially of past trauma, affects current intergroup relations, how our moral preferences affect attitudes and behaviors in conflict and the way in which collective threats affect ideologies and worldviews. Students will also analyze a case study, based on a current event.

Democracy in Ethnically Divided Societies

Democracy in Ethnically Divided Societies (2 credits)

Lecturer: Dr. Steven J. Klein, Ben Gurion University and senior editor at Haaretz newspaper

Course Description:  The post-WWII era saw the creation of numerous new countries that did not fit the classic nation-state model, often comprising rival ethnic groups. These internal conflicts have presented challenges to the ruling elites when interested in establishing a democratic regime. Factors such as the perceived threat by or manageability of ethnic minorities have influenced the type of democracy pursued and the extent of democratic rights afforded to these minorities. Such experiments of forging the country’s ethnic character while maintaining a certain measure of democratic institutions have had mixed results, often contributing to grievances among minority groups and at times failing to prevent bloodshed.

In this class, students will deepen their understanding of principles of ethnic conflict and conflict management theory, exploring the conditions for creating so-called ethnic democracies and maintaining their stability. They will also explore the repercussions of managing democracies in ethnically divided societies for interethnic relations and international politics. The class will examine case studies of such democracies, such as Sri Lanka, Israel, Malaysia and former states of the Soviet bloc. Students will have the opportunity to explore these case studies more deeply or other case studies through class presentations and a midterm project. 

Other Possible Courses

 

 

  • Theories of International Migration: Dr. Noah Epstein
  • Forced Migration and Humanitarian Systems: Chamutal Afek- Atias
  • Modern Diplomacy: Dr. Noam Kochavi
  • International Migration in International Relations: Gallya Lahav
  • International Environmental Law: Dr. Issi Rosen-Zvi
  • Islam and the West: Dr. Uriya Shavit
  • Comparative Analysis of National and International Conflicts: Former Ambassador Dr. Alon Liel
Hebrew and Arabic language courses

 

 

Before the start of the Fall Semester, intensive full-time summer language courses are available for an additional cost. Information about the summer intensive Hebrew and Arabic language courses can be accessed here.

During the Fall and Spring Semesters, Hebrew classes at all levels are available:

1. Monday to Thursday morning classes (open to all): Classes meet 8:30 - 10:00 each day.

2. Sunday Classes (open for Graduate/ Post-Graduate students only): Classes meet from 15:00 - 19:30.

Fee: $500 for one semester. Students who study Hebrew in the fall semester and wish to continue into the spring semester will pay a total of $800 (second semester fee will be reduced to $300 instead of $500 for continuing students). Registered students receive placement and classroom information prior to the beginning of the academic year.

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